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Another Way To Look at Trash and Waste: Vermicompost That Crap!

Have you ever looked at the United States food waste statistics?  It’s sickening.

When reviewing the *USDA statistics, you will find that 30-40% of our food supply ends up as garbage.  Without widespread recycling or composting programs, a lot of that food ends up in our landfills.  This is a problem that all of us should care about.  I am happy that more and more people are becoming aware of this problem and playing their part in trying to combat it.

The average American wastes over 600 pounds of food per year.  Before you say, “no, not me!” consider all the food you leave on your plate at a restaurant, the amount of chips and salsa, bread, or crackers you leave on the table at restaurant establishments.  Think about that produce that rots on your counter, the leftover food that doesn’t get eaten or that whole bag of spinach that somehow gets lost behind the condiments in the refrigerator.

I have found since starting vermcomposting that my home itself (a household of 2) easily generates 2 pounds of scraps a week and that isn’t even including waste we generate when we eat out OR the the non-compostable items (at least indoors) such as meat or dairy.

It has been eye-opening.  I realize how JUST a small home composting system can in fact make a huge impact.  I am collecting food waste from three friends in addition to my own waste at a rate of 4-8 pounds per week.  That’s up to 416 pounds of waste a year that I am personally keeping out of the landfill.

Did you know that the United States ships a lot of our garbage waste overseas because of the limited space our landfills have left?  This is completely unacceptable.

Let’s look at this from another perspective.  Have you ever been to a Farmer’s Market?  A ballgame?  A buffet?  What do you think happens to all that uneaten or unpurchased food?  It spoils and in many cases is thrown away.

Walking out of a baseball game earlier this week, my friends and I were commenting on how all of the homeless people begging for money outside of the ballpark could benefit greatly from some of the food that will be thrown out after the game.  We can naively think that all of these establishments donate to food kitchens, but lets be real… most of that food will hit a dumpster tonight and those homeless individuals will go to their park benches or tents hungry.

Another conversation I had not that long ago was with a friend who works in a grocery store.  I inquired as to whether or not I could take some produce that was past its prime off of their hands to compost.  Do you know what he said?  Policy doesn’t permit it.  Liability issues demand that they throw it all away.

How can we fix any of this?  I wish I had the power to sway company policies all on my own but I know that isn’t realistic.  So, to all the companies who donate to food kitchens or have waste programs: I commend you!  To those that don’t… I encourage as many people as possible to write to their local grocers and encourage them to reconsider their policies.

After learning all of these things, I have found a side of myself that I didn’t realize I had.  I never considered myself a tree-hugger or environmentalist but I assure you I am reformed in my mindset and priorities.  I no longer have any guilt about produce that turns… I know that it is going to good use.  I now have organically grown vegetables indoors AND out.  I am helping to reduce my carbon footprint.  I am helping HEAL the environment by rebuilding the soil structure on my modest property.  Composting is the coolest thing that I have ever started.  Hands down.

Did you know that a portion of carbon emissions are actually produced by the process of treating our garbage waste?  How?  Well, it takes trucks to haul, it takes water to process, it takes space to store.  Methane gasses are released in this process further harming the environment.

Consider this… if each one of us could get five people to start composting, even a pound a week, that would be 1,825 pounds of waste WE personally helped to save from hitting the garbage.  If I can convince five of you to do that, over 9,000 pounds of waste will stay out of the landfill.  Consider that when you think that small composting projects don’t make an impact.

What’s the benefit of vermicomposting in this equation?

Vermicomposting speeds up the composting process exponentially.  Let’s be honest, how many of us keep up with the lawn-waste compost pile?  To work ideally, you have to keep a very calculated carbon: nitrogen (bedding to food) ratio in order for it to work the way we hope.  The beauty of indoor (or outdoor) vermicomposting is that the worms help the process work much faster.  I create several gallons of compost each month with ease and NO downtime during the winter months.  No measuring my carbon:nitrogen ratios, just listening to my worms based on the health of their bins and it’s pretty darn easy at that.

If I fed my 10 gallon bins aggressively, I could easily handle a pound of food per week.  Due to the multitude of systems that I run, I tend to run fairly conservative on how much I feed, but I know my systems could handle more in most cases.

I challenge each of you to run even a single 10 gallon tote and see how much waste you can keep from hitting the garbage.  I bet once you get started you will be just as addicted as me and be searching out additional food sources to compost before long!  Let’s be a part of the solution.  Let’s lead the revolution… let’s be the change that our environment needs so much!  I hope that my children one day will be able to enjoy a healthy planet, so I will continue to do my part as long as possible!

Some small changes make a huge impact:

1. Save all of your scraps and compost them in whatever method you have available.  Worm composting (vermicomposting), the outdoor compost pile, bokashi, etc.

2. Drink tap water- use a Brita filter or something similar, but avoid buying plastic water bottles on a regular basis.

3. Recycle whatever items possible.  Be it newspapers, plastic bottles, metal cans, or food… do what you can!  No amount is too small.  Reuse glass containers.  Be creative!

4. Buy worms!  My worms are the greatest investment I ever made.  Better yet, find someone local who will sell you sone worms or even give you some to start out… this eliminates the need to utilize the mail system.

5. Bypass the straws, plastic silverware, paper plates and styrofoam. Try buying bamboo silverware to take to work instead of the plastics, use reusable metal or glass tumblers.  Use your own plates, glasses and reusable straws.

6. Grow your own food.  Part of the methane and greenhouse gas emissions are created by the trucks, planes, trains, boats, etc. that transport our food.  Have some space on the side of the house?  A balcony that gets sun?  Try your hand at gardening and bypass the middle-man and know where your food is coming from!

With just a few small changes and creative ways to utilize your waste, you too can be a part of reducing the stress on the environment while repairing the soil and creating the best organic fertilizer on the planet!

 

*Statistics from the USDA that are discussed in this post can be found at: https://www.usda.gov/oce/foodwaste/faqs.htm